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A Texas oil company enmeshed in a decade-long dispute over leases to drill […..]

Drowning in a sea of lawsuits and recall costs, Japanese air bag maker Taka […..]

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The Senate Republican health-care bill would achieve a historic convergence […..]

More 529 plans, the accounts that give families a way to put away cash for […..]

NEW YORK -- Stores like Saks and Urban Outfitters are looking to work out m […..]

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Wall Street Journal

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Billionaire activist investor Daniel Loeb’s Third Point hedge fund has taken a $3.5 billion stake in Nestlé SA, piling pressure on the world’s largest packaged foods company to find ways to accelerate growth.

Takata filed for bankruptcy protection in Japan and the U.S. and said it would sell most of its operations to a rival, nearly nine years after it began a global recall of rupture-prone automotive air bags.

Facebook is talking to Hollywood studios and agencies about producing TV-quality shows with an eye toward launching original programming by late summer, people familiar with the matter said.

To limit earthquakes, the Dutch government has for years been imposing increasingly strict production limits at Groningen, Europe’s biggest gas field, and is now proposing another 10% cut.

A senior executive at casino operator Crown Resorts got a a sentence of 10 months in prison for gambling crimes, an Australian government official in Shanghai said.

The Federal Reserve on Wednesday will release the final results of this year’s bank stress tests. Officials made the tests easier for some banks this year, and for the next time around they are preparing to further change the exams in fundamental ways.

The BIS, a consortium of central banks, warned that rising protectionist sentiment and a retreat from global cooperation on economic matters would threaten the world economy.

New-home sales rose in May and prices hit a record, more evidence of a housing market characterized by strong demand and tight inventories.

House Republicans are struggling to agree on a plan to fund the federal government for 2018, a critical task that they must tackle before moving ahead with ambitions for a tax overhaul.

Senior lawmakers in both parties are resisting the Trump administration’s moves toward imposing steel tariffs on national-security grounds, worried that other countries could use the same argument to block exports from their states.

Elon Musk’s SpaceX on Sunday successfully executed the second of two unmanned missions within a roughly 48-hour period in a high-water mark for the company’s operational prowess.

American moviegoers are losing interest in some of Hollywood’s biggest franchises, depriving studios of their most profitable ticket sales even as international audiences in some foreign markets keep showing up.

Federal prosecutors allege that the former Turing Pharmaceuticals CEO committed a series of interconnected frauds, misleading investors in his hedge funds and looting a publicly traded pharmaceutical company to cover the losses.

The Senate’s health-care bill repeals hundreds of billions of dollars in taxes on businesses and high-income households and includes a retroactive cut in capital-gains taxes.

The European Central Bank requested greater powers to supervise euro-denominated clearing, stepping up a tug of war between European Union authorities and Britain over the future of the lucrative business line after Brexit.

The Bank of Mexico lifted the overnight interest rate target by a quarter percentage point to 7%, the highest level since early 2009, and indicated that the tightening cycle that began in September has ended for now.

Apple Inc. will still sell an iPhone, but expect the device to morph into a suite of apps and services, enhanced with AI and AR, part of a ‘body area network’ of devices, batteries and sensors.

After the retailing giant paid $3.3 billion for Jet.com, it had to cope with the startup’s weekly happy hour and other ‘touchstones in the culture.’

House Republicans are proposing eliminating the deduction that companies get for interest they pay on debt, a move that would alter modern finance. Yet the plan has gotten relatively little public attention or lobbying pressure.

The Brexit vote sank the pound but buoyed the FTSE 100. That relationship might be changing.

BlackBerry’s share price surged in the months since it was awarded millions in an arbitration dispute with Qualcomm. Disappointing quarterly results wiped out a chunk of those gains.

As a group, U.S. households’ debt-to-income and debt-to-asset ratios in the first quarter fell to their lowest levels since the early 2000s. But financial obligations beyond debt payments, such as rents and auto leases, are taking a bigger bite out of pay.

Investors need to consider the political risk faced by China’s version of Twitter.

This year’s bank stress tests turned up an unpleasant surprise for Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley. The banks scored low on a metric introduced for the first time this year, the supplementary leverage ratio, meant to measure banks’ total leverage.

High flying Anbang and HNA are the latest victims of a broad crackdown on risk in China. The well-worn thesis that China would have a boring year ahead of its leadership summit has proven false.

An internal investigation at Hain Celestial Group found past errors in its accounting were immaterial. Investors care more about the company’s future, which still looks troubled

The Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017 is here, and investors aren’t remotely concerned.

The investors who have sunk many billions into Uber can take at least some comfort in the reality that scale still matters—by a lot.

Facebook is talking to Hollywood studios and agencies about producing TV-quality shows with an eye toward launching original programming by late summer, people familiar with the matter said.

Google, which has long portrayed itself as one of the world’s best workplaces, is facing government accusations that it underpays women and resisting pressure to turn over salary data to disprove them.

Elon Musk’s SpaceX on Sunday successfully executed the second of two unmanned missions within a roughly 48-hour period in a high-water mark for the company’s operational prowess.

Uber’s senior managers have been urging its more than 15,000 employees to stick around and see how the embattled company reinvents itself after the ouster of its CEO.

Apple Inc. will still sell an iPhone, but expect the device to morph into a suite of apps and services, enhanced with AI and AR, part of a ‘body area network’ of devices, batteries and sensors.

Apple’s iPhone, and the smartphone boom that followed, gave rise to whole new industries, laid waste to others and forced new business models. As the device turns 10, we take stock of its impact.

There are more cellphones in America than people. That market saturation has led to brutal price competition, which in turn is transforming consumers’ costs, industry profits and antitrust law.

Former Uber Technologies Chief Executive Travis Kalanick knew an engineer had allegedly stolen Google files before hiring the engineer last year, according to Uber’s attorneys.

As Uber has grappled with the leadership turmoil that led to its chief executive’s resignation this week, its much-smaller rival has built market share and expanded aggressively, even as its founders counsel humility.

Tesla said it is exploring with government officials in Shanghai the possibility of opening a manufacturing facility to build electric vehicles for the Chinese market.

Google said its computers will soon stop reading the emails of its Gmail users to personalize their ads, a move that addresses a longstanding privacy concern about a product that is central to its growing corporate-services business.

Indian outsourcing giant Infosys agreed to pay $1 million to settle claims that it placed foreign workers in jobs in New York without obtaining proper visas or paying high enough wages or taxes for their work, the state’s attorney general said.

Apple is helping third-party re-sellers, mulling new flagship stores and firing up app-development centers in India as it runs to catch up in one of the world’s biggest smartphone markets.

Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg took a step toward defining a new vision for the social-media company as it grapples with how to handle its growing power in the world.

BlackBerry Ltd. stock plunged 11% in Friday trading after the company posted a steep drop in quarterly revenue as it continues to shift focus to its burgeoning software business.

Outbrain, best known for placing sponsored links on publishers’ websites, has laid off 4% of its roughly 600-person global workforce.

President Donald Trump on Thursday told technology and telecom executives the government will tackle federal regulations they consider too restrictive but stopped short of announcing any specific policies aimed at their industries.

Taiwan’s Foxconn Technology Group, which assembles Apple’s iPhones in China, is looking at seven states in the American heartland where it would invest $10 billion or more in factories to build flat-panel screens.

Investors need to consider the political risk faced by China’s version of Twitter.

Imagination Technologies Group, a small U.K. technology firm which has been one of Apple’s important suppliers, said Thursday it has put itself up for sale.

Shares of Altice USA traded higher in their market debut Thursday, a day after the cable operator raised more money in its IPO than any other U.S.-listed telecom since 2000.

Oracle Corp. said Wednesday its quarterly profit rose 15% from a year earlier to $3.23 billion.

Comcast’s NBC Sports plans to televise an esports tournament later this summer, the latest broadcaster turning to competitive videogaming to grow viewership at a time when many consumers are cutting the cord.

Escalating concerns about cyberthreats are prompting the aviation industry to devise an unlikely new safeguard: real-time warnings to pilots about potential hacking attempts.

J.D. Power’s annual Initial Quality Study, a closely watched indicator of which companies make the best cars and technology, found that buyers are increasingly dissatisfied with the semiautonomous features showing up on vehicles.

Virgin Mobile, the phone carrier founded by mogul Richard Branson, will become the world’s first iPhone-only carrier.

The Trump administration plans to dismantle a regulation that would have helped more foreign-born entrepreneurs build startups in the U.S. without a traditional visa, which could rankle Silicon Valley.

Chris Lattner, who Tesla announced in January was hired from Apple Inc. as vice president of Autopilot software, has left Elon Musk’s Silicon Valley auto maker.

The Japanese government seized the lead role in buying Toshiba’s chip unit after expressing concerns about technology leaking to China, but a legal fight could hold up a deal.

When Amazon.com Inc. announced Friday it was buying Whole Foods, the stock market got a taste of something long missing: volatility. If Amazon is one extreme in how companies invest, General Electric is the other, writes Greg Ip.

Chapter-based, for-profit media companies have been popping up in college markets across the U.S. As more traditional outlets struggle, these student-based sites have a lower-cost model to produce content—and revenue.

Amazon.com is giving shoppers another reason not to visit stores. The online giant is rolling out a free service to let its Prime members try on clothes at home, its latest attempt to crack into the fashion world.

To identify people more easily, scientists are enlisting computers to automate the creation of facial images that age in sync with the people they portray.

Few companies other than Amazon could announce a $14 billion takeover of a mature firm, give no details of why they are buying the very business model they’re trying to disrupt, and have their market value rise by more than the takeover price.

As the Apple Inc. iPhone’s 10th anniversary approaches, Personal Technology columnist Geoffrey A. Fowler penned two letters to tell it how he really feels.

With the help of small LCD screens, digitally animated eyes are giving once-stoic toys—from race cars to Cabbage Patch Kids—a highly expressive makeover.

Ride sharing and self-driving vehicles are going to redefine our relationship with cars. Auto makers and startups are already gearing up for the change.

Since Apple launched the iPhone in June 2007, the smartphone revolution it unleashed has changed the way people work and socialize while reshaping industries from music to hotels. It also has transformed the company in ways that co-founder Steve Jobs could hardly have foreseen.

Some are earning north of $20,000 to fix those cracked screens and broken microphones.

Confronted with the market power of Facebook and Google, marketers and ad holding companies would welcome the emergence of a third power in digital advertising. But Amazon, Snap, Verizon and AT&T all have an incredibly long way to go challenge the “duopoly.”

The social-media company woos advertisers by promising them their ads will only appear beside content curated by editors and users. Now, it needs to grow.

In many far-flung communities, where available broadband speeds barely surpass old-fashioned connections, residents sacrifice not only their online pastimes but also chances at a better living.

Google owner Alphabet Inc. is finalizing an order to buy 300 modular apartment units from a startup for a building likely to serve as short-term housing for employees.

When Angela Hartley Brodie first came up with a new way to treat breast cancer in the 1970s, there was little interest from the pharmaceutical sector. But her persistence over the years paid off.

Massive growth in online spending will help fuel world-wide growth in the technology sector in the next decade, Yuri Milner, founder of DST Global, said at The Wall Street Journal’s D.Live Asia 2017 conference.