Links to other chambers

The Swedish Wire

Denver Post

Occupational licensing requirements cost the U.S. economy between 2 million […..]

Denver Academy was founded on the belief that education isn't a one-si […..]

It would be a first for a U.S. national park: Requiring reservations to get […..]

Colorado’s unemployment rate in June stayed at 2.3 percent for the third st […..]

Cotter Corp. told Colorado state health officials it wants to transfer its […..]

As wildfire season begins to quiet on the Western Slope, engineers and tech […..]

The Mecum car auction roars into Denver where enthusiasts view hundreds of […..]

As the new form of dwelling has made its way into housing markets, a proble […..]

Steamboat Resort and the Colorado Tramway Board are still in the process of […..]

Wall Street Journal

  • WSJ.com: US Business
  • WSJ.com: Markets
  • WSJ.com: WSJD

GE told investors that profits are under pressure and they would have to wait several months for a better sense of its business, sending shares tumbling.

The U.S. Treasury Department imposed a $2 million fine on Exxon Mobil Corp. for what it called a “reckless disregard” of U.S. sanctions on Russia while Secretary of State Rex Tillerson was the oil giant’s chief executive, a finding the company immediately said it would challenge.

Tobacco companies want U.S. regulators to bless smokeless tobacco as a safer alternative to smoking, as cigarette consumption falls. In its campaign, Big Tobacco has unusual supporters: some public-health advocates.

Wal-Mart has agreed to invest in Plug Power Inc. and buy more of its fuel-cell-powered machines, a move that mirrors a deal struck by Amazon earlier this year.

Dalian Wanda Group’s retreat from the business reveals the challenges China faces in becoming a show-business superpower. So far, it hasn’t matched the global success of Hollywood’s film and TV studios, which continue to fuel U.S. theme-park empires.

ECB policy makers haven't yet discussed the future of their bond-purchase program after its tentatively scheduled end in December, but will do so in the fall, ECB President Mario Draghi said.

The Trump administration is asking the Defense Department and other agencies to assess industry’s ability to fill U.S. defense needs.

The International Monetary Fund provides public access to board-meeting minutes only up to 2010, even though its guidelines require that such information should be available for more-recent deliberations.

For the first time in years, pay for lowest-income Americans is rising faster than for other groups. Weekly pay for earners at the lowest 10th percentile of the wage scale rose at a faster rate last quarter, from a year earlier, than any other group.

The number of Americans applying for first-time unemployment benefits fell last week, another signal of a buoyant job market.

Microsoft continued its rebirth as a force in cloud-computing, posting stronger-than-expected gains in its business of selling web-based services to corporate customers.

Anheuser-Busch InBev is acquiring Hiball, a San Francisco-based company making organic energy drinks and carbonated juices and water.

PepsiCo’s longtime leader Indra Nooyi is promoting one of her lieutenants to serve as the company’s president, filling a No. 2 role that has been vacant for nearly three years and shuffling around her potential successors.

As the job market tightens, small-business owners are boosting pay to keep experienced hands from jumping ship.

Although little progress was made at Washington-Beijing trade negotiations this week, Beijing appeared a day later to want to project stability ahead of major leadership shuffle.

Known for his teasing tweets and ever-expanding list of high-tech ambitions, Elon Musk set observers abuzz again with a vague claim he received “verbal” approval for a high-speed, tunnel-based travel system along one of the busiest corridors in the U.S.

Workers assembling General Motors Co.’s Tesla fighter are taking a month off this summer amid lukewarm demand, a sign American car buyers are showing little interest in vehicles that rely solely on battery power to get from Point A to B.

Capital One sees default rates declining after a worrying jump, but investors should stay skeptical.

Private equity groups Blackstone and CVC are looking to join the payments party with a preliminary near-$4 billion offer for U.K.-listed Paysafe, the company revealed Friday. It looks like a gamble Paysafe shareholders should welcome.

Quarterly earnings show that General Electric’s new chief will have a tough time meeting lofty expectations for 2018

European Central Bank President Mario Draghi said Thursday that the euro’s gains had “received some attention” on the ECB Governing Council, but the currency isn’t the only factor that counts for financial conditions.

BHP has written off billions in U.S. shale investments, but it is poised to plow a substantial amount of funds into potassium fertilizer, or potash. Activist shareholder Elliott is kicking up a fuss.

One of China’s most prominent auto makers has been the gift that kept on giving for investors, but not for long.

One factor helping to keep the VIX and realized volatility extremely low is quant funds that are discovering surprises before they can create big stock-market moves.

Natural gas pipeline delays in the Marcellus and Utica shale producing regions have caused a sharp discount for gas sold in the region.

The European Central Bank is playing for time on extreme monetary policy. But markets know a decision on winding down its bond-purchase program can’t be put off forever.

Lyft said it is forming its own autonomous-car development division, hiring hundreds of engineers for it and opening a new office in the heart of Silicon Valley.

Microsoft continued its rebirth as a force in cloud-computing, posting stronger-than-expected gains in its business of selling web-based services to corporate customers.

Known for his teasing tweets and ever-expanding list of high-tech ambitions, Elon Musk set observers abuzz again with a vague claim he received “verbal” approval for a high-speed, tunnel-based travel system along one of the busiest corridors in the U.S.

Twitter said it has clamped down on harassment on its service, a campaign that is forcing the company to confront tricky questions about how it applies its standards.

Beijing’s internet censors are now targeting foreign movies and TV shows that are popular with young Chinese as it tries reinsert Communist ideology into public life.

Samsung’s plan to conquer Siri, Alexa and Google Assistant moves talking AIs in an ambitious new direction. Too bad Bixby under-delivers in its debut in the Galaxy S8, writes Geoffrey A. Fowler.

Two of the world’s largest online marketplaces for criminal goods have been shut down in a global operation that also resulted in the arrest of their owners and the freezing of millions of dollars in alleged criminal proceeds.

Qualcomm said profit fell 40% in its latest quarter, the first in years that didn’t include patent royalties on devices from Apple.

Seven months after Honda Motor announced plans to collaborate with self-driving car pioneer Waymo LLC, little progress has been made, Honda’s chief executive said.

T-Mobile US Inc. continued to grow in the second quarter and raised projections for the year, saying that it still expects to capture all of the growth in the market’s most desirable customer group.

Senators applauded the qualifications of three nominees to the Federal Communications Commission at a hearing on Wednesday, but remained sharply divided on the policies they will try to enact once confirmed.

The European Union’s top court is set to decide whether the bloc’s “right to be forgotten” policy stretches beyond Europe’s borders.

Facebook is launching a new analytics tool in partnership with Nielsen that will give news outlets more data on how their stories perform on the platform.

China’s internet censors have demonstrated a new strength—the ability to delete images in one-on-one chats as they are being transmitted, making them disappear before receivers see them.

International Business Machines said second-quarter profit fell 6.9% from a year earlier as revenue declined in the business units that include its cloud computing and Watson-artificial intelligence operations.

A new version of the product targets large corporate customers—not general consumers.

Teen girls studying at NYU’s cybersecurity camp are taking steps toward a cutting-edge profession--and the field less of a boys club.

Sizmek, an advertising technology company owned by private-equity firm Vector Capital, has agreed to acquire public ad-tech company Rocket Fuel for $125.5 million.

Netflix blew through its estimate for subscriber growth in the second quarter, adding 5.2 million users, as the streaming giant showed it is thriving in a hotly-competitive market for internet television.

Tesla, which has faced criticism from its investors about a lack of independent directors, named 21st Century Fox CEO James Murdoch and Ebony Media CEO Linda Johnson Rice to its board.

Hank Greenberg’s Starr Cos has acquired a minority stake in CoverWallet, a New York startup that aims to dramatically speed up the insurance-buying process with data analytics.

A former technology worker at a biometrics company that Apple Inc. (AAPL) bought in 2012 agreed to pay nearly $280,000 to resolve insider trading accusations.

A lawsuit against Disney has roped the company into a legal dispute over rights to a visual-effects technology, potentially threatening its ability to profit from the top-grossing movie so far this year.

Google won’t need to turn over an entire set of employee compensation data to federal auditors, dealing a setback to the Department of Labor’s effort to prove the internet giant is underpaying women.

Freight-services startup Flexport Inc. is stepping off the cloud and into the real world. The San Francisco-based firm, which helps customers arrange freight shipments online, will open its first warehouse on Aug. 1 near the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.

International Business Machines is unveiling its next generation of mainframes, the industrial-strength computers that underpin industries like banking and insurance, highlighting an old product category that still drives much of its profit.

The co-founder of encrypted messaging app Telegram said Sunday that it will put together a team of moderators who are familiar with Indonesia’s language and culture to remove terrorist-linked content after Indonesia’s government limited access to the service and threatened a complete ban.

Jet.com, the online retailer owned by Wal-Mart Stores, and real-estate technology startup Latch are aiming to expand their reach by offering a free system to New York City landlords to potentially make shopping online easier for tenants in nondoorman buildings.

As Apple Inc.’s 10th anniversary iPhone approaches, Samsung Electronics Co.’s new Galaxy S8, with a curvaceous display screen, is raising the design stakes.

Condé Nast, Time Inc., Hearst and other legacy magazine publishers are redoubling their efforts in online video after learning from their stumbles over the past few years.

The company is expected to raise its sales forecast for the recently launched console-handheld hybrid Nintendo Switch when it reports earnings next week.

New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer demanded the city school system fix the way its keeps track of technology, saying that auditors inspecting a small sample of buildings couldn’t find nearly 2,000 desktops, laptops and tablets that were supposed to be there.

The tech titan has named Isabel Ge Mahe to a newly created executive role to oversee operations in a market where the iPhone maker faces increasingly fierce competition and regulatory challenges.

Google, Facebook, Amazon and other tech behemoths are transforming the U.S. economy and labor market, with scant public debate or scrutiny. Changing course won’t be easy.

As auto makers such as GM and tech companies like Google and Apple rush to develop self-driving cars or their software, the world’s largest vehicle market—China—is creating roadblocks by limiting who can map its highways.

As he tours America, the Facebook CEO appears at homes and businesses with little notice, asks not to be quoted; not always recognized.

The iPhone maker will begin storing all cloud data for its customers in China with a government-owned company—a move that means relinquishing some control over its data.

Google operates a little-known program to harness the brain power of university researchers to help sway opinion and public policy, cultivating financial relationships with professors nationwide.

A Chinese startup that sells facial recognition systems to police secured venture-capital funding that values it at more than $1.5 billion, underscoring the sector’s emergence as one of technology’s hottest areas of interest.

As Tesla begins a launch of its first mass-market car, the company said it plans to triple its capacity to repair vehicles, adding 1,400 technicians, dozens of new service centers and hundreds of maintenance vans.

Engineers are using cognitive psychology, including techniques for studying how human children learn, to uncover the inherent biases built into AIs and machine learning that can lead to mistakes.

Apple’s iTunes Store—already struggling against growing competition for music listeners—is losing the battle for video viewers. The company’s market share for renting and selling movies has slid over the past decade.

There is enough strength in a new class of tech success stories that funds no longer need to be invested in Facebook, Amazon, Netflix or Google.

Apple has kicked off a massive experiment with new privacy technology aimed at solving an increasingly thorny problem: how to build products that understand users without snooping on their activities.

Longing for more focus and calm in a tech-riddled world? Set your sights on a handcrafted bow and arrow.

Researchers have started to unravel why older brains are less flexible than young ones—and have used their findings to reverse the process.

With Facebook working on a way for people to communicate telepathically, Joe Queenan imagines who would gain. Millennial job-seekers, perhaps?

For years, Dish Network has sought out partnerships with just about every major telecom company. Now, a somewhat surprising potential partner has emerged: Amazon.com.

As a slew of Silicon Valley companies confront accusations of unfair treatment of women and minorities, Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business is trying to help would-be entrepreneurs create more conscientious companies.

Technology companies have transformed Manhattan Midtown South neighborhoods such as the Flatiron District, Chelsea and SoHo into popular office locales. These days, other sectors are ramping up their presence.